Select Page

Listening to learn. Leading to win.

#LeaderLinks from Around The Web (10/01/2017)

This is a weekly post of links from around the web that I read and enjoyed. I hope you find them helpful.

One of the things I enjoy most about creative people is that they love ideas, and they always seem to have more coming. The more they give away, the more new ideas they seem to have. Creativity and generosity feed each other. That’s one of the reasons I’m never reluctant to share ideas with others. I’m convinced that I will run out of time long before I run out of ideas. It’s better to give some away and contribute to another person’s success than to have them lying dormant in me. – John Maxwell, 25 Ways To Win With People

#LeaderLinks

What Every Church Leader Wants, But Not What Every Church Leader GetsTim Stevens

There is one common theme. I hear it over and over. And it comes from leaders of all stripes. Some are young and just getting started; some have been in ministry for 15-20 years or longer; some are campus pastors; others are teaching pastors; many are youth or children’s pastors. But the words are almost identical:

I just want to have a seat at the table.

 

The Most Under-Appreciated Characteristic of Strong LeadershipMichael Hyatt

Humility is the most under-appreciated characteristic of strong leadership. The good news is that, as leaders, we can learn. We can grow. If we don’t, we risk large-scale, public failures that will have a catastrophic, negative impact on the people we are entrusted to lead.

 

10 Characteristics of Humble Leaders I Have KnownChuck Lawless

Proud people readily criticize others, thus building up their own status (at least in their own minds). Humble leaders, however, don’t waste their time tearing down other leaders.

 

4 Ways to Spot an Interested Leader (Not One Focused on Being Interesting)Eric Geiger

In his famous work, Good to Great, Jim Collins coined the phrase “level five leader.” The leaders Collins wrote about were ones who were fiercely and boldly committed to the mission of those they led but simultaneously humble. Humility and boldness can and must coexist in a leader’s life. Collins described the level five leaders as being interested, not focused on being interesting. They were passionately curious, always learning, always seeking what was best for the organization. They were not self-consumed and preoccupied with being perceived as interesting and genius.

 

My Relationship with LeadershipEd Stetzer

I have a love/hate relationship with leadership.

First of all, I hate it because I’m not a natural born leader. I’ve never been able to step into leadership roles effortlessly. I meet people who just become leaders because of who they are. I have never been that person. I was a bookworm and a nerd. Leadership was not something I naturally inherited; it was a skill and a practice I had to learn. And learn I did.

I am the Director of Communication at College Park Church in Indianapolis, IN. We are a growing communications team serving a family of three churches around central Indiana.

I am also a husband, father of three girls under 5 years old, and a lifelong student of entrepreneurship.

I love connecting with new friends. Link up with me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn.

Related Posts

3 Ways Young Leaders Remain Teachable

3 Ways Young Leaders Remain Teachable

Being teachable is how you consistently grow in strengths and skills. We often think of being teachable as a “spirit” more than action. Below are 3 actionable ways young leaders can remain teachable.

6 Goals For Your First 6 Months

6 Goals For Your First 6 Months

Starting a new position is an exciting new journey. With so much to learn and think about as you transition to your new role, be sure to focus on the first 6 months on the job. The years ahead will thank you.

8 Ways To Turn Problems Into Positivity

8 Ways To Turn Problems Into Positivity

When leaders approach problems with a positive perspective, teams can see through the immediate pain and confidently push through the problem solving process. John Maxwell has a great acronym he uses for seeing problems with a positive perspective.

Related Posts

6 Goals For Your First 6 Months

Starting a new position is an exciting new journey. With so much to learn and think about as you transition to your new role, be sure to focus on the first 6 months on the job. The years ahead will thank you.

8 Ways To Turn Problems Into Positivity

When leaders approach problems with a positive perspective, teams can see through the immediate pain and confidently push through the problem solving process. John Maxwell has a great acronym he uses for seeing problems with a positive perspective.